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Showing posts from April, 2012

Best practices in blogging... No, really.

I am regularly asked for advice on the how-to's of social media from people/companies who haven't stopped to consider their intentions or desired outcomes. Before I will tell them how to develop a blog or a tweet sheet, I walk them back to the beginning: "Why do you want to use these social media channels? What do you hope to accomplish?"

Most companies have jumped onto the social media bandwagon like middle America jumped on CBs in the 1970s. Somehow we were all convinced we couldn't drive cross country without having a superficial conversation with a trucker on the same interstate. Fads pass.

So, is social media a fad?

Nope - not at all because there's a commercial benefit to social media (unlike CBs) if used correctly. And that's the key. Social media is inherently interactive. Most people do what I am doing and send their words out in to the ether without taking the time to follow these best practices:
You have to blog regularly - probably daily - to g…

Getting what you want...

I loved this post about the importance of being a good negotiator. (See CIO: 7 Career Tips to Help You Negotiate Better.) I had a wonderful manager early in my corporate career who responded to my request for a raise by coaching me through a proper negotiation. When she offered me the job - my first out of graduate school - I was so excited that I screamed, "Yes!!!" into the phone before she could finish making the offer. So when I requested another raise within a year of receiving a 10% raise, she knew my negotiating skills needed help. She could have simply said, "No," and I would have dropped it. Instead, she prompted me to get online and do my research - go find out what someone with my qualifications is earning on average in roles similar to mine. It helped me understand the relative decency of my current salary and go back to her with a more structured, concrete request. I got a 25% increase that time.

Now, we all know it's easy to make big jumps early in…

CIOs don't use Social Media

This article about CIOs and Social Media is a bit of a misnomer. (See CIO: Getting New Value out of Social Media.) CIOs aren't big users of social media. Somewhere deep in the layers of management, you'll find users of social media. That will change as today's adopters age into corporate leadership roles, but for now, rest assured your CIO isn't tweeting or following anyone - it's someone in Marketing Communications. Disillusioned? Oh, grow up. We all know how that works.

When I built out the social media strategy for the largest division of a global Fortune 10 company, my biggest challenge was selling everyone on targeted interactions. People who don't understand social media think there is merit in noise: How many tweets did we send about our trade show booth? How many followers do we have on Facebook? How many clicks did we get on that blog post?

These measures have some validity, but if ever the maxim quality over quantity applies, it's here. Corporation…

Quit sucking up all the bandwidth, dude!

The report out this week on Procter & Gamble's decision to block access to bandwidth sucking sites such as Netflix and Pandora really cracked me up. (See CNN: A new reason to stay off the Web at work.) I don't know why P&G's decision is newsworthy. Everyone is trying to address this issue. Last year, a client and I were discussing some network performance issues. In evaluating response times across their network, they identified heavy bandwidth users and the sites they hit most - and it was all non-work related. The individual utilizing the most bandwidth viewed tens of thousands of YouTube videos in a matter of weeks. So while an employee on Facebook and Twitter may be inhibiting their own productivity, the dude streaming media is slowing the operations for thousands of colleagues and/or end customers. That's a real problem.

I have maintained for years that the advent of the internet and the increasing ubiquity of mobile technology would blur the lines between…